The Junction

The Junction
Clifton Way, Cambridge, CB1 7GX
  • Telephone 01223 511511
  • Opening times Mon–Sat 10am–6pm; Closed Sun.
  • Email
  • Website www.junction.co.uk
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Cambridge Junction

Just 15 minutes walk from the city centre, The Junction prides itself in providing cutting edge and new theatre for the local area. With three main stages (J1 which sits 850, J2 which sits 220 and J3 which is a multipurpose space for rehearsals, talks ,etc).

Events at this venue

Sorted by date & time / title

Friday 20 April

J2 £22.50 adv 01223 511511
2 £22 01223 511511
J3 £3 01223 511511

Saturday 21 April

£22 01223 511511
£14 adv 01223 511511
J2 £17 adv 01223 511511

Sunday 22 April

J2 £10 adv, phone for availability 01223 511511

Monday 23 April

£11 01223 511511
2 £12.10 01223 511511

Tuesday 24 April

J2 £14.85 01223 511511

Wednesday 25 April

£6 01223 511511

Thursday 26 April

J2 £11 01223 511511

Friday 27 April

£8.50 adv 01223 511511
J2 £12 01223 511511

Saturday 28 April

£17 adv 01223 511511
£12 01223 511511
£10 adv 01223 511511

Sunday 29 April

£10 (Children £6) 01223 511511
J2 £10 01223 511511
£10 (Children £6) 01223 511511
J2 £10 01223 511511

Monday 30 April

J2 £32.50 adv 01223 511511
2 £33 01223 511511

Tuesday 1 May

£16.50 01223 511511

Wednesday 2 May

£12.50 (£8) 01223 511511

Thursday 3 May

£13.50 01223 511511

Friday 4 May

£13.50 01223 511511

Saturday 5 May

£6 01223 511511
£15.50 (£13.50) 01223 511511

Sunday 6 May

£10 (Children £6) 01223 511511
£10 (Children £6) 01223 511511

Monday 7 May

£16.80 01223 511511

Tuesday 8 May

2 £16.50 01223 511511

Friday 11 May

£16.50 (£14.50) 01223 511511
£22.50 01223 511511

Saturday 12 May

2 £13.20 01223 511511
£13.50 01223 511511

Sunday 13 May

£14 adv 01223 511511

Tuesday 15 May

£11 adv 01223 511511

Wednesday 16 May

£8–£12.50 01223 511511

Thursday 17 May

£13.50 (£11.50) 01223 511511

Friday 18 May

£5 01223 511511
£17 01223 511511

Saturday 19 May

£14 adv 01223 511511
£13.50 adv 01223 511511

Sunday 20 May

£10 (Children £6) 01223 511511
£10 (Children £6) 01223 511511

Monday 21 May

£16.80 01223 511511
2 £13.20 01223 511511

Tuesday 22 May

£24.75 01223 511511
2 £14.30 01223 511511
£13 01223 511511

Wednesday 23 May

£18.70 01223 511511
2 £18.70 01223 511511

Sunday 27 May

£17 01223 511511

Tuesday 29 May

£20.35 01223 511511

Saturday 9 June

2 Cancelled 01223 511511
£11 01223 511511

Monday 11 June

£14 01223 511511

Wednesday 13 June

£15 01223 511511

Friday 22 June

£22 01223 511511

Monday 25 June

2 £16.50 01223 511511

Friday 13 July

£24.75 01223 511511
£24.75 01223 511511

Monday 23 July

£41.25 01223 511511

Saturday 8 September

2 £19.80 01223 511511

With The Face and The Keepers.

Friday 14 September

2 £12.65 (£11) 01223 511511

Monday 17 September

2 £19.25 01223 511511

Friday 21 September

£19.80 01223 511511
£18 01223 511511

Saturday 22 September

£27.50 01223 511511

Friday 28 September

Tuesday 2 October

Thursday 4 October

2 £12.10 01223 511511

Tuesday 9 October

£15.40 01223 511511

Friday 12 October

£16 01223 511511
£18 (£16) 01223 511511

Saturday 13 October

Tickets on sale Feb 23 01223 511511

Saturday 20 October

Times to be confirmed / Phone for prices 01223 511511
£13.20 01223 511511
£15 01223 511511

Tuesday 23 October

£22 01223 511511

Thursday 25 October

£20 01223 511511

Friday 26 October

£13.50 01223 511511
£16.50 01223 511511

Monday 29 October

2 £14.85 01223 511511

Friday 2 November

£14.30 01223 511511

Saturday 3 November

2 £12.65 01223 511511

Wednesday 7 November

£19.25 01223 511511

Tuesday 13 November

£20.35 01223 511511

Friday 16 November

£12 01223 511511

Monday 19 November

£22.50 01223 511511

Wednesday 28 November

£15.40 01223 511511

Friday 7 December

£20.35 01223 511511

Friday 14 December

£22 01223 511511

Saturday 15 December

£16.50 01223 511511

Friday 1 February 2019

£27.50 01223 511511

Friday 19 April 2019

£15.40 01223 511511

Comments & ratings

1. Lucy Jones10 Jun 2011, 4:52pm Report

Peter Kirwan : 03 Jun 2011 17:41 | Tags: News | Comments (1) | Close comments | Report a problem

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Lucy Jones
NOBLE KINSMEN

CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL OF VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS at The Junction
Tuesday 7 June

Performances of THE TWO NOBLE KINSMEN are still as rare as the proverbial hen’s teeth, though in recent years it has been increasingly popular with drama schools. This revival by an enthusiastic cast of international students – quite probably the play’s first ever Cambridge airing – was not the most profound I’ve seen, but it was certainly the most enjoyable.

I had gone intending to listen for the differing authorial voices, but with five minutes has ceased caring whether this scene or that soliloquy were by Shakespeare, Fletcher, both or neither, such was the exuberance and panache of Jean Stewart’s lively and beautiful production.

It is a Jacobean retelling of Chaucer’s version of the ancient Greek tale of Palamon and Arcite, two devoted cousins who become implabable rivals for the hand of Duke Theseus’ sister Emilia.

Interwoven is a subplot concerning a jailer’s daughter, driven mad (Ophelia-like) by her love for Palamon. Georgina Dugdale gave a virtuoso performance in this touching role; with the fragility of a Puccini heroine and exemplary vocal and movement skills, she all but stole the show.

Whether she or the audience fully understood the filthy significance of the double-entendres that pepper her ramblings – especially after a Doctor (Lindi Lewis – very amusing) has prescribed a curiously modern for of sexual therapy – I rather doubt.

Rebecca Cuthertson’s edition of the text played up the sunniness and funniness, playing down the echoes of earlier Shakespeare plays, and cutting entirely the sexually ambiguous scene where the rival cousins, preparing to fight each other, lovingly arm one another first.

The eighteenth century setting, and the casting of girls as the noble kinsmen, would have made this difficult to play. Generally, though, the former worked remarkably well, for that was an era when male pride taken to its extremes counted for something.

Similarly, the gender-blind casting emphasised the absurdity of the protagonists’ obsession. Caroline Maroney and Mealangell Dolma gave nicely contrasting characterisations, though Ms Dolman’s strutting, self-satisfied Arcite was only a thigh slap away from Principal Boy!

The most affecting performance, though, was not the busiest nor the noisiest: as Emilia, object of the cousins’ rivalry and the only character to see through and beyond the absurdity of it all, Nadia Babke displayed an astonishing serenity and depth of feeling, emerging as the still point at the storm’s centre.

On the minus side, there was too much overacting by sup

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