Noel Gallagher still clueless over Champagne Supernova meaning

  • Bang Showbiz
  • 7 July 2017
Noel Gallagher

Noel Gallagher

Noel Gallagher is still clueless of the meaning of 'Champagne Supernova', but says it doesn't matter because fans have their own interpretation of it

Noel Gallagher still has no idea what 'Champagne Supernova' is about.

The 50-year-old rocker wrote the song, which is the closing track on Oasis' seminal 1995 album '(What's the Story) Morning Glory?', but has since forgotten what it means.

However, he says it doesn't matter as the young people in the crowd at his shows won't be able to remember it anyway and will have their own conception of the hit.

According to the Daily Star newspaper, he said: "I was on stage in Glasgow and I was playing 'Champagne Supernova' and I was thinking: 'What is this song about? What does it actually mean?' I don't even know what it means.

"And I look up from my guitar and there's a sea of people on each others' shoulders, some of the guys topless waving their shirts around and I think: 'It doesn't matter what it means.'"

The 'Wonderwall' hitmaker is not "hung up" about forgetting the meaning because of how the track has translated to the masses.

He said: "It meant something on the night I wrote it, I've long since forgotten what it was, but when you see that, it doesn't matter what.

"It means something to them and because these people were so young, they're only like 15, 16, it can't bring back memories. They're not old enough to have memories.

"So it's something that's been passed down and I don't get hung up about it."

The guitarist - who supports U2 with his High Flying Birds this weekend at Twickenham Stadium in London as part of their 'Joshua Tree Tour' - previously shared a funny anecdote about how a journalist suggested the track wouldn't be a "classic" because of the "ridiculous lyrics".

In 2005, he said: "This writer, he was going on about the lyrics to 'Champagne Supernova', and he actually said to me: 'You know, the one thing that's stopping it being a classic is the ridiculous lyrics.' And I went: 'What do you mean by that?' And he said: 'Well, Slowly walking down the hall, faster than a cannonball -- what's that mean?' And I went: 'I don't know. But are you telling me, when you've got 60,000 people singing it, they don't know what it means? It means something different to every one of them."

Comments