Cuttin' A Rug effectively captures Glaswegian working-class life in the late 1950s

Cuttin' A Rug effectively captures Glaswegian working-class life in the late 1950s

Credit: Shiona Walker

Phil, Spanky and co. return to the stage for part two of the Byrne's trilogy

Following on from last year's Citizens revival of The Slab Boys, the second part of playwright and artist John Byrne's trilogy arrives to continue the adventure of Phil, Spanky and company. With the heroes heading to Paisley Town Hall for the annual carpet factory dance, Byrne's script casts a wry eye over the tentative teenage rebellions of the teddy boy generation.

John Byrne's glorious gallus patter merchants are a slice of Paisley life – rough-hewn diamonds of working-class characters caught up in a world that is about to change, yet still clings to the more decorous manners and hierarchies of an earlier age. And while it has an iconic status within Scottish theatre, Cuttin' A Rug retains relevance: both the comedy and the tragedy of young men trying to escape the constraints of their class and era.

This version of the tale of factory paint mixers, starring brothers Ryan and Scott Fletcher as the anti-heroes, alongside Anne Lacey and Paul James Corrigan, will be directed by original cast member Caroline Paterson, as what she calls 'a celebration of Paisley and also John's work'. And with Paisley in the running for City of Culture 2021, it couldn't be a timelier spin.

Citizens Theatre, Glasgow, Wed 8 Feb–Sat 4 Mar; King's Theatre, Edinburgh, Tue 7–Sat 11 Mar.

Cuttin' a Rug

The second play in John Byrne's much-loved Slab Boys trilogy.

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