Miracle Glass Company – MGC1 (2 stars)

Miracle Glass Company: MGC1

A disappointing debut from MGC

Why do people buy cruising yachts? There are plenty of other large objects that lose value when they're in the sea, but sailing boats, the kind with mizzen masts and aft decks, rather than the gleaming white Bond-villain type, remain in vogue with the marina scene because they're considered timeless.

Edinburgh's VoxBox Records, an independent record shop with a fledgling label attached, has just embarked on what they call their most ambitious release yet: a deluxe blue vinyl pressing of MGC1, the debut album of hook 'n' harmony revivalists Miracle Glass Company.

Recorded in just four days, the musicianship of Miracle Glass Company is undoubtedly of a high quality. By switching around lead vocal duties, as well as exploiting close three-part harmonies on almost every track, there's a pleasing equality between the trio.

If the sound they were aiming for was timeless, the sort of thing that conjures up memories of Merseyside in the 60s and the Lennon/McCartney partnership at the peak of their powers, then they've achieved their goal. The question is, however, whether there's any point in listening to another record that dutifully doffs its cap to Abbey Road and Revolver.

There are some nice moments – lead single 'T-R-O-U-B-L-E' is catchy enough – but in keeping resolutely to a course plotted through the inspirations and icons of 20th century rock, Miracle Glass Company miss their opportunity to bring something new to the table. Producer Owen Morris, previously associated with The Verve and Definitely Maybe-era Oasis, has helped to give MGC1 a bit of polish and sheen, but makes the same mistakes that the Gallaghers and Richard Ashcroft still make today, in only daring to imitate their influences.

Here's the thing about sailing yachts: as satisfying as that classic look is, they're really slow and they don't have Wi-Fi. Similarly, MGC1 is a record for those disinterested in going anywhere new anytime soon.

MGC1 is out via VoxBox Records on Fri 14 Oct.

Miracle Glass Company

Austen George (The Set Up), William Douglas (William Douglas & the Wheel), and Andy Duncan (Miyagi, The Black Diamond Express) perform psychedelic rock as Miracle Glass Company.

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10. Fedbelly10 Oct 2016, 9:58pm Report

What he wrote of the album is at odds with the review's 2 star conclusion. It was actually a nasty thing to do. I've heard the album and seen them live and think they are the best guitar band in the UK just now. I suppose some people just don't like guitar bands and have a chip on their shoulder.

The silver lining is that I think the band can lift a nice quote:

"Timeless, the sort of thing that conjures up memories of Merseyside in the 60s and the Lennon/McCartney partnership at the peak of their powers".

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12. Jay Miles22 Oct 2016, 7:36pm Report

The first album in a long time that I have listened to all the way through. Possibly the most exciting thing to come out Edinburgh if not Scotland since god knows what. Pretty poor review. Can't think of anything else happening that isn't twangy twee nonsense that just wants to be the likes of Mumford and sons. Better to draw influence from further back than to be like every other contemporary band that just floods the market with more gash.

13. Jay Miles22 Oct 2016, 10:54pm Report

If the reviewer can only reference the Beatles, the verve and oasis then perhaps his musical knowledge is limited. There is so much more in there. Crosby stills and Nash, The easybeats and a whole host of west coast sounds. Just lazy writing.

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