Karren Brady's 'favourite task' on The Apprentice was producing gin

Karren Brady's "favourite task" on 'The Apprentice' was producing gin because she got to sample the product, which she never spat out as required for alcohol tasting

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Karren Brady

Karren Brady

Karren Brady's "favourite task" on 'The Apprentice' was producing gin.

The 47-year-old businesswoman - who is a panellist on the BBC One show alongside Lord Alan Sugar - has revealed she found the most enjoyment from the show when the budding entrepreneurs were asked to produce alcohol, because she has to sample the product.

Speaking to The Mirror Online about the programme, the Baroness said: "My and fellow adviser Claude Littner's favourite task was when they produced gin. We had to try it, of course."

And Karen has revealed instead of spitting the gin out, which you are meant to do when sampling alcohol to avoid getting inebriated, her and her colleague kept swallowing.

She explained: "And it was pointed out that our spittoon [where you're supposed to spit it out] was empty. We were just drinking the gin - we took that day pretty seriously!"

And the star has revealed she also enjoyed a project hosted at an attraction site, because it mimicked a sketch on the popular comedy 'Carry On' franchise.

She explained: "There's another one where they host an event at an attraction. I called it 'Carry On Up The Aquarium' - it's hysterical."

However, Karren has admitted despite the entertaining episodes, this series is much "tougher" than any season before.

She explained: "The tasks start tough then get tougher. There are more elements to each one so we can see if the candidates have all the skills for creating a good business. Everyone has a role to play, nobody can hide."

And Lord Sugar's colleague has revealed she has had to stay awake until the early hours of the morning chasing the contestants.

She said: "Yes. If it says we're up at 2am, we were. I've spent most of this series in trainers and jeans, doing late nights. What's great about 'The Apprentice' is that it's authentic. There is no set-up, no script, no retakes. Any entertainment that comes from it happens naturally. I tell the candidates: 'Please don't ask me anything, I'm not here.' They know the rules, Claude and I are just there to observe and report back to Alan."

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