Preview: Konstrukt – 'Curiosity helps... but you either like it or you don't'

Free jazz spacemen invite Glasgow gig-goers into their orbit

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Konstrukt

**UPDATE 13 Sep 2016**
Event cancelled due to illness.


Istanbul's cosmic jazz stars, Konstrukt, unite lo-fi electronics, space rock and free jazz to create their utterly unique sound. Guitarist Umut Çağlar is modest, if bluntly realistic about the mass appeal of the band's music. 'Curiosity helps, but we don't believe in educated ears. You either like it or you don't.'

The group – as well as Umut, there's Korhan Futacı on sax, bassist Barlas TanÖzemek and Ediz Hafızoğlu on drums – will bring their psychedelic world sounds to Glasgow's Glad Café in September, with special guest bass saxophonist and improv innovator Tony Bevan. Bevan's name was a new one to them, Çağlar says, 'but we always get excited to meet new musicians and discover new possibilities. We checked a few of his works and I felt that he would give a sharp and strong edge to our music.'

Konstrukt are hardly strangers to tenacious collaborations. Over the years their gravitational pull has drawn in jazz and improv greats such as Marshall Allen, Evan Parker, Akira Sakata and Thurston Moore. Çağlar reckons a roster of impressive guests was a way in for people who might not have ordinarily given their genre a try.

'The experimental music scene and audience was very immature when we started to play back in 2008. As we played more and more with those names, we discovered that it taught us to be more flexible, musically, so we've never stopped.'

'Anything can happen,' he says of their Glasgow gig. 'Considering that this is our first show in Glasgow, excitement and curiosity will shape the music a lot. The place and the audience play a huge role on the music, so it would be appropriate to say that the gig will reflect the fresh energy of performing in Glasgow for the first time. You should come with an open mind and heart.'

Konstrukt

Istanbul based free music ensemble perform their brand of liberating jazz music alongside Alexander Hawkins, Alan Wilkinson and Daniel Spicer.

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