Agatha Christie's The Witness For The Prosecution to screen on BBC

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Aidan Turner

Aidan Turner

An adaptation of Agatha Christie's classic novel 'The Witness For The Prosecution', which follows the story of the murder of heiress Emily French in 1920s London, has been commissioned by the BBC.

Agatha Christie's 'The Witness For The Prosecution' has been commissioned by the BBC.

An adaptation of the classic novel - which follows the story of the murder of heiress Emily French in 1920s London - will find its way to screens for two hour-long episodes.

Sarah Phelps, who adapted J. K. Rowling's 'The Casual Vacancy' for the BBC in 2015, is returning to lend her expertise to the script whilst Julian Jarrold will direct.

Sarah said: "With the long terrible shadow of the Great War falling across the rackety, feral 1920s, The Witness for the Prosecution is a compelling story of deceit, desire, murder, money and morality, innocence and guilt, heartbreak and most painful and dangerous of all, love.

"At the centre of this dark and tangled net is the astonishing character of Romaine, a noir heroine for all our times."

It is not yet known when 'The Witness For The Prosecution' is expected to appear on screens across the country.

The BBC previously released a TV adaptation of Agatha Christie's novel 'And Then There Were None' starring Aidan Turner, Douglas Booth, Charles Dance, Miranda Richardson, Anna Maxwell Martin and Sam Neill.

It was screened to mark the 125th anniversary of Christie's birth.

Her grandson Mathew Prichard said of the production: "I am so excited that this, the most iconic of Agatha Christie stories is being made for television with this truly extraordinary cast.

"My grandmother would be thrilled to know that a new generation will be able to enjoy 'And Then There Were None' when it appears on the BBC."

Whilst BBC drama commissioner Polly Hill said at the time: "We are thrilled to be bringing Agatha Christie's wonderful novel to the television screen for the first time. This stellar cast will prove to be a real treat for the BBC One audience."

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