Carry On films coming back

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The 'Carry On' franchise is being brought back to life by 'Two Pints of Lager and a Packet of Crisps' writers Board Comedy Tim Dawson and Susan Nickson.

The 'Carry On' franchise is being revived.

The famed bawdy big screen British comedy series, which originally ran from 1958 to 1978 with a brief comeback in 1992 and comprised of 31 films, is being brought back to life with two new titles 'Carry On Doctors' and 'Carry On Campus' and the first release scheduled for 2017.

'Two Pints of Lager and a Packet of Crisps' creator Susan Nickson and Tim Dawson, who worked on the sitcom from 2008 until 2009, are penning the scripts.

A source told The Sun newspaper: "This has been on the cards for some time. All being well with work on the script it will start shooting in October with a release pencilled in for 2017 - which will coincide with the 25th anniversary on the last film. There's a brilliant team behind this and they're determined to make it a success."

The film series made household names of the likes of Kenneth Williams, Sid James, Charles Hawtrey, Joan Sims and Bernard Bresslaw played the central characters in the Gerald Thomas directed films - which were traditionally made on a budget of less than £300,000 and included comic romps such as 'Carry On Up the Khyber' and 'Carry On Camping'.

Dame Barbara Windsor, who starred in 10 of the movies, and Jim Dale, who appeared in nine, are the surviving stars of the franchise but will not be appearing in the new movies.

The source added: "They want it to be a fresh start in terms of the cast, so it will be a completely new set of characters but with the old cheekiness of the past films."

Nickson is incredibly excited to be getting the chance to revive the 'Carry On' franchise, which are part of British culture.

Speaking to Variety, she said: "I'm thrilled to be involved in perhaps the biggest comedy franchise in Britain. I grew up watching these films and to be working on this project feels like coming home. They're peculiarly British but the appeal of the humour and the ever-present message that good people always win is absolutely global."

Dawson added: "These films are a part of British culture and to be carrying on the legacy of Norman Hudis and Talbot Rothwell is a thrill and a responsibility" said writing partner Dawson. "We intend to be sympathetic to the heritage whilst being unafraid to modernize the franchise for a whole new audience. This is my dream job."

Brian Baker, who was gifted the rights to the franchise from 'Carry On' legend Peter Rogers, will act as executive producer on the new titles with Hereford Films and believes the appeal of the movies never went away.

He said: "I'm thrilled to be involved in perhaps the biggest comedy franchise in Britain. I grew up watching these films and to be working on this project feels like coming home. They're peculiarly British but the appeal of the humor and the ever-present message that good people always win is absolutely global.

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