Debbie Harry: I had moments of doubt about Blondie

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Debbie Harry

Debbie Harry

Debbie Harry admits she had "doubts" about the future of Blondie in the group's early days, but she couldn't give up on her dream to make music and become a rock star.

Debbie Harry had "moments of doubt" about Blondie's future.

The 'Call Me' hitmaker admits when the group first started in 1974 they had a really tough time trying to get their music heard by potential record labels and getting airplay for their underground sound before they became known as pioneers of new wave punk.

And despite questioning their future they "struggled" on because they caught the rock star "bug".

Debbie - who is joined by Chris Stein, Clem Burke, Leigh Foxx, Matt Katz-Bohen and Tommy Kessler in the current line-up of the band - said: "We had a really hard time being heard. DJs, radio, record labels, they were really not into it. But you push harder, or you walk away.

"We had moments of doubt, I'm sure. We all struggled with it. But it's like a virus, in a way. You get bitten by this bug, being a rock star or musician or whatever it is, and you really can't get away from it."

Before the 70-year-old star met her bandmates she always knew she wanted to make music that was "something different" to what was in the charts and heard on the radio and wanted to prove that she could be much more than a typical housewife.

She told the latest issue of Uncut magazine: "My intention was to find something different. To not feel that being a housewife in New Jersey was the end-all and be-all of my life.

"I was very determined to discover who I was. I loved listening to radio, I always had my head in the speaker. My overall plan was to satisfy my urge to do music, in some way."

And the 'Heart of Glass' hitmaker believes she owes a lot of Blondie's success to the late music legend David Bowie and Iggy Pop who gave them a high-profile support slot.

She previously said: "When the 'Low' album was out and Iggy Pop was about to tour, David played keyboards in Iggy's band. They asked Blondie to open for them, and, as they say, the rest is history. Without this visionary and his friend Iggy Pop where would Blondie be today?

"Silly question and one that can't be answered really, but there is no doubt in my mind that Bowie played a big part in our future successes."

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