OneRepublic's new single is about 'unhealthy obsession'

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Ryan Tedder shot by Hiroshi Clark

Ryan Tedder for Wonderland magazine by Hiroshi Clark

Ryan Tedder of OneRepublic says the band's new single is about an "unhealthy level of obsession" for the band's new single 'Wherever I Go'.

OneRepublic's new single 'Wherever I Go' is about an "unhealthy level of obsession".

Frontman Ryan Tedder has opened up about the lead single on their eagerly anticipated fourth studio album, which they began making back in August of 2014.

However, Tedder says the track is not a reflection of the tone of the entire LP which has promised will surprise fans.

Talking about the meaning of the track, the 36-year-old singer told Wonderland magazine: "It's very much about obsession, and almost an unnatural, unhealthy level of obsession. It doesn't personify the entire album and I think it's going to really surprise people, the other thing I'll say that's rather important is that we spent ages making sure that it was actually live."

The 'Counting Stars' hitmaker - who has penned tracks for the likes of Beyoncé Knowles, U2, Adele, Gwen Stefani and Taylor Swift - was hugely influenced by Swedish indie group Miike Snow and Icelandic post-rock band Sigur Rós when making the album.

Asked what artists influenced the sound, he said: "A lot of what intrigues me the most is some of the weirder stuff so like Sigur Rós and Miike Snow - I mean when you hear it you'll definitely hear some of that kind of - I've been a long time fan of Miike Snow, so you'll probably hear a little hint of that kind of melody."

An integral part of the making this record was ensuring the instruments and "human beings" were audible and as a result Ryan says it's the most "progressive music" he's ever worked on.

Talking about the as-yet untitled record - which will be the band's first studio LP since 2013's 'Native' - he said: "We wanted to make sure that you could actually hear the human beings and the actual instruments that are in the actual songs. It's new and very modern but there's still a big dose of humanity in it because you can actually hear the players. I'd say it's hands down the most progressive music I've ever been a part of whether inside this band or outside of this band."

The album is expected to be released later this year.

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