September Girls – Age of Indignation (3 stars)

Menacing undertones and dreamy guitar make up multi-layered second album

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September Girls – Age of Indignation

Since the release of their debut album Cursing The Sea, Dublin quintet September Girls have been characterised by their hazy, ominous sound; showered with feedback and akin to The Jesus and Mary Chain and Vivian Girls. Two years on and the band are showing signs of real tenacity and control with their follow-up album Age of Indignation, a release that takes on a complexity that is mature both in style and subject matter.

‘Ghost’ opens the gates to the album’s menacing undertones with a dreary guitar riff that ebbs and flows in a six-minute cacophony of white noise. This sinister element continues on into ‘Jaw On The Floor’ and is further emphasised by the male-female vocal homophony, achieved through the addition of Oliver Ackermann from A Place To Bury Strangers. ‘Catholic Guilt’, like ‘John Of Gods’, is aggressive in its delivery, aiming its resentment towards the Catholic Church. The lo-fi ‘Salvation’, meanwhile, is more slow-burning and sombre.

Closing track ‘Wolves’, written by drummer Sarah Grimes, is a definite highlight, offering something strikingly different, despite remaining in-line with the album’s sullen and atmospheric ambience. What Age of Indignation fundamentally lacks is the variation notable in ‘Wolves’, where the thick texture adds a distinct layer of emotion, previously unheard to the same extent. Nevertheless, the track hints at the potential that lies within September Girls, which could be fully realised should their next release tap into this idea of contrast.

Though signs of their influences remain buried deep within the fuzzy instrumentation of the album’s 10 tracks, there is something refreshing about the band’s desire to add a new depth in the form of political and religious narratives. Through this, Age of Indignation encapsulates a darkness that is far from superficial.

Out now on Fortuna POP!

September Girls

Indie-pop quintet.

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