Dwayne Johnson invites cancer patient to Baywatch film set

  • Bang Showbiz
  • 3 March 2016
Tater (Instagram)

Tater (Instagram)

Dwayne 'The Rock' Johnson has invited a terminally ill boy called Tater to meet him on the set of the new 'Baywatch' movie

Dwayne 'The Rock' Johnson has invited a terminally ill boy called Tater to meet him on the set of the new 'Baywatch' movie.

The seven-year-old boy, who suffers from stage four cancer, got in touch with his WWE champ idol-turned-actor over Facebook with a handwritten letter saying why he wants to meet him.

And Dwayne, 43, responded to the youngster on Instagram.

He uploaded a photo collage of Tater with the message: "Tater! Guess what buddy? I'm coming to meet you!! I want you to be my special guest on our #BAYWATCH set in Savannah, GA. Everyone on set is excited to meet you... especially the pretty girls! Uh oh. Tater, not only am I super pumped to meet you, but I'm a big bald headed LUCKY DUDE to meet you as well. Big man you're way stronger than I'll ever be and you better get ready, because I hug like a bear! Can't wait to meet you Tater and your family big man! Stay strong! Your buddy ~ DJ

"PS: Your nickname 'Tater' is almost as cool as 'Rock'. Actually it's way cooler. (sic)"

Speaking of his idol in the heartfelt letter, Tater said: "I think you are strong, but I am very strong too. I've been struck by hundreds of needles, have had TONS of shots, gone through 8 surgeries, too many blood and platelet transfusions, lots and lots of chemo treatments, radiation therapy, tests, scans and 2 stem cell transplants. (sic)"

Baywatch

  • 2 stars
  • 2017
  • US
  • 1h 56min
  • 15
  • Directed by: Seth Gordon
  • Cast: Dwayne Johnson, Alexandra Daddario, Zac Efron, Priyanka Chopra, Kelly Rohrbach, Ilfenesh Hadera
  • UK release: 29 May 2017

Mitch (Johnson) is a devoted life-saver who reluctantly recruits Matt (Efron), a disgraced champion who’s only doing it as a kind of community service. Plenty of good jokes, but minor characters almost drowning doesn’t make for good cinema, and the relentless formulaism makes it long outstay its welcome.

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