Black T The 2014 Hot 100 in association with

The Hot 100 2014: 60-51

The Glad Café, David Mackenzie and Still Game among Scotland's hottest cultural contributors in 2014

The Hot 100 is The List's annual celebration of the figures who've contributed most to the cultural landscape during the year. From chefs and theatre-makers to writers and musicians, you'll find them here.

60 Still Game

The Hot 100 2014: 60-51

credit: Graeme Hunter In front of many packed houses at the less than poky Hydro, Jack ‘n’ Victor and their Craiglang crew put on a show which retained the best elements from the sitcom. But they also remembered this incarnation of Still Game was a theatre experience, and few willl forget its spectacular Bollywood-style finale. (Brian Donaldson)

59 Hidden Door Festival

The Hot 100 2014: 60-51

image: Digital Jones In a year when Edinburgh’s tricksy cultural scene (world-leading for one month, ignored for the other 11) was being re-examined locally, Hidden Door was a well-meaning, self-started celebration of music and art hosted over a week in a series of disused market street lock-ups. (David Pollock)

58 Stanley Odd

The Hot 100 2014: 60-51

credit: Jannica Honey A great year for scottish hip hop was completed with the excellent new album from Edinburgh’s Stanley Odd. A Thing Brand New was rammed with top tunes and a social conscience (‘Son I Voted Yes’ was a hit on the indyref circuit) and their exhilarating live shows were a joy to behold. (Brian Donaldson)

57 Nicola Benedetti

The Hot 100 2014: 60-51

For many, the Ayrshire-born violinist is the face of Scottish classical music, but behind the glossy image lies an accomplished, questing musician and committed educator; Benedetti scored a top 20 hit with her Scottish-themed Homecoming and is a revered ‘big sister’ to the kids of Scotland’s Big Noise music projects. (David Kettle)

56 RM Hubbert

The Hot 100 2014: 60-51

A fiver if you find anyone who badmouths RM Hubbert. The virtuosic guitarist got his second SAY Award nomination (after winning in 2013), released Ampersand Extras, reunited with ex-band El Hombre Trajeado, played in East End Social, and politicked articulately around the referendum. (Claire Sawers)

55 Damian Barr

The Hot 100 2014: 60-51

The author of last year’s hugely popular memoir, Maggie and Me, about growing up and coming out in the shadow of Thatcher, Barr has spent 2014 as a guest presenter on Radio 4’s Front Row and is running his immensely popular Salon nights in london with some of the most exciting authors around as guests. (Katie Welsh)

54 David Mackenzie

The Hot 100 2014: 60-51

Having directed a mixed bag of recent releases (Spread, Perfect Sense, You Instead), Mackenzie finally delivered an undisputed triumph with Starred Up. A brutal prison drama told with clear-eyed compassion, it rightly swept the Scottish BAFTAs and might even be the best British film of the year. (Paul Gallagher)

53 Dominic Hill

The Hot 100 2014: 60-51

credit: Eamonn McGoldrick Hill’s considered aesthetic has made his productions of classic plays, including Hamlet, more than just predictable retreads of familiar scripts: he brings a punk energy and visual flair to his ambitious reimaginings, giving Glasgow’s Citizens Theatre a clear and bracing identity. (Gareth K Vile)

52 Rustie

The Hot 100 2014: 60-51

Having gathered plenty of acclaim for Glass Swords in 2012, Glasgow’s own Russell Whyte was back with his second album on warp, green language. Featuring collaborations with Danny Brown (‘Attak’) and Redinho (‘Lost’), it cemented his position as one of the planet’s best and most future-facing electronic producers. (David Pollock)

51 The Glad Café

The Hot 100 2014: 60-51

The southside’s been glad all over since this music venue / café opened in 2012, rapidly becoming a busy arts hub, with choir / magazine / secondhand clothes shop offshoots. This year The Glad Café hosted ‘Living Library’ book events, gigs by Alasdair Roberts and Joe McPhee, anti-violence discussions in their Glad Academy, plus screenings of Finding Fela and referendum documentaries. (Claire Sawers)

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