Legendary D&B producer Goldie turns his hand to medieval liturgy with Fragments of Gold

The classical/electronica project is inspired by historic document the Hawick Missal Fragment

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It’s an unexpected fusion of tweed blazers and gold grills, where medieval chants meet clubland, but that’s where you will currently find Goldie, the drum and bass producer turned composer for his latest project, Fragments of Gold.

Goldie, or Clifford Joseph Pierce to give him his Sunday name, has been working since 2012 on a music and art collaboration inspired by the ‘Hawick Missal Fragment’, a section of a missal – a book containing the texts and chants for a mass – discovered five years ago in Hawick. Goldie has written a composition inspired by it, to be performed by Scottish musicians in Glasgow Cathedral.

Goldie became famous in the late 90s as a D&B producer, but clearly doesn’t enjoy resting on his laurels, having dabbled in acting (a Bond movie, Snatch and an appearance on Eastenders are now on his CV), ballroom dancing (he was on 2010’s Strictly Come Dancing), then visual art (he’s exhibited work in Berlin, Ibiza and the London Underground), but is now passionate about bridging the gap between electronic and classical music.

Goldie composed his music for Fragments of Gold electronically before Dr Matthew Cheung Salisbury, music lecturer at University College Oxford (Cheung described the process as ‘when the don met the DJ’), arranged and adapted it for a special live acoustic performance. The concert will be accompanied by a talk from Goldie and an audience Q&A session.

‘It’s an absolute honour to be involved in such an exciting project at Glasgow Cathedral, a wonderful and iconic venue, and to hear my composition performed by fantastic musicians from all over Scotland,’ says Goldie. Amen to that.

Fragments of Gold, Glasgow Cathedral, Sat 30 Aug.

Goldie and the Fragments Project

Drum'n'bass pioneer turned classical composer Goldie presents new work Fragments of Gold, in collaboration with the Fragments Project.

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