Interview: choreographer Marc Brew on new outdoor project (i)Land

‘I love creating outdoor work as there are no preconceptions about contemporary dance or disability'

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Interview: choreographer Marc Brew on new outdoor project (i)Land

When you happen upon a pile of sand in the middle of the street, it usually pertains to a building endeavour. But when the Commonwealth Games are in town, you learn to expect the unexpected – in this case, choreographer Marc Brew and his new dance work, (i)Land.

Set on a desert island (aka six tons of sand in the middle of the Merchant City), the work features three characters all looking for an escape route. When they discover a potential way out – a ‘contraption’ they build to take them across the water – a new problem arises when only one of them can fit into it.

‘It creates an interesting tension between the characters,’ says Brew, ‘and their relationships evolve during the piece. Who should go? Who should stay? Or do they all even want to go? I was interested in exploring identity, isolation, independence and the fight for land and ownership.’

As a wheelchair user, Brew has found a myriad of dynamic ways to choreograph his own body – with this new venture opening up even more possibilities. And by performing in the public domain, he’s free to work without the constriction of labels.

‘I absolutely love creating outdoor work for the general public,’ he says, ‘as there are no preconceptions about contemporary dance or disability. Some see the publicity and are enticed to watch the performance, others just stroll by and discover us. But once they arrive they’re hooked to the end. (i)Land is performed in the round, and can be viewed differently from where you are around the island – so some people even come back again.’

South Brunswick Street, Glasgow, Thu 24 & Fri 25 Jul.

(i)land - Promo Trailer

(i)Land

A new outdoor dance piece from choreographer Marc Brew. Three castaways stranded on a dessert island work together to reconstruct a vehicle buried in the sand, only to discover that it won't carry all of them. The piece explores questions of isolation and exclusion; ingenuity and invention; and the politics of disability…

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