Douglas Gordon's video works form an essential part of the GENERATION project

Gordon's career spans the 25 years of contemporary Scottish visual art the project wishes to celebrate

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Douglas Gordon's video works form an essential part of the GENERATION project

Douglas Gordon, Pretty Much Every Film and Video Work From About 1992 Until Now © Douglas Gordon. Photography credit: Installed for National Galleries of Scotland, 2006. Photography A Reeve

‘We have been keen for some time to work with Douglas again within the city,’ explains Sarah Munro, director of Glasgow’s Gallery of Modern Art. ‘The context of GENERATION presented us with the perfect opportunity to dedicate a major new exhibition of his work centre stage.’

Pretty Much Every Film and Video Work from about 1992 until Now is a tidy as well as important contribution to GENERATION; the work offers an encyclopaedic overview of Gordon’s moving image practice throughout almost the entire 25 year period that GENERATION seeks to celebrate.

Gordon has previously described the piece as having ‘evolved into what looks a little bit like a flea market for television’. Indeed, what started as a modest survey has quickly grown as the artist continues to pursue moving image work and faithfully updates the show to remain true to its title.

The GoMA incarnation of the piece will consist of 82 videos exhibited on 101 screens, playing simultaneously. The most recent work to be added is Silence, Exile, Deceit: an industrial pantomime, a three-channel video shot in Essen last year. Iconic films such as the breakthrough work, 24 Hour Psycho which was first exhibited at Tramway in 1993, the Turner Prize-winning video Confessions of a Justified Sinner and Gordon’s innovative A 21st Century Portrait capturing French footballer Zinedine Zidane are but a few of the others.

Pretty Much Every Film and Video Work from about 1992 until Now, Gallery of Modern Art, Glasgow, Fri 27 Jun--Sun 28 Sep.

Douglas Gordon: Pretty Much Every Film and Video Work From About 1992 Until Now

An encyclopaedic retrospective of one of Scotland's most celebrated contemporary video artists, including the eponymous installation.

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