Graham Fagen to represent Scotland at the 2015 Venice Biennale

  • The List
  • 24 March 2014
Graham Fagen to represent Scotland at the 2015 Venice Biennale

Graham Fagen, Peek-a-Jobby, 1998 (part of GENERATION) / Photo courtesy of Graham Fagen and Matt's Gallery, London

The artist will present a solo exhibition commissioned and curated by Arbroath's Hospitalfield Arts

Visual artist Graham Fagen has been selected to represent Scotland at the 2015 Venice Biennale. The Glasgow-born artist, whose previous work has combined video, performance, photography, sculpture, text and even plants, will present a solo exhibition commissioned and curated by Arbroath’s Hospitalfield Arts in the prestigious Venice art show, from 9 May–22 November 2015.

Fagen has exhibited internationally, and has previously tackled issues of human identity and culture through the recurring themes of flowers, journeys and popular songs in his work. He was invited by the Imperial War Museum to work as the official war artist for the Kosovo conflict in 1999, and his work was previously shown in Venice at the 50th Biennale in 2003. For his 2015 Venice presentation, Fagen will work with Hospitalfield Arts, an artists’ centre based to the south of Arbroath that offers residency programmes for visual artists and writers in a 19th-century arts and crafts house built by artist Patrick Allan-Fraser. Fagen’s presentation will be the seventh Venice show organised by Scotland + Venice, a partnership between Creative Scotland, the National Galleries of Scotland and the British Council Scotland, and the artist was selected by a panel from all three organisations.

Hospitalfield Arts director Lucy Byatt said: ‘It is an outstanding opportunity for Hospitalfield Arts to work closely with an artist such as Graham Fagen and to bring to Venice a project that emerges from our work in Arbroath in the beautiful region of Angus.’ Fagen added: ‘The Biennale is one of the most important events in the international calendar for the visual arts and I hope that I can do justice to its history and Scotland’s participation in it.’

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