Arctic Monkeys to headline T in the Park 2014

The Sheffield indie boys are the first act announced for next year's festival

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Arctic Monkeys to headline T in the Park 2014

Photo: Zackery Michael

Arctic Monkeys are the headliners to be confirmed for T in the Park 2014. The announcement comes just days before tickets to the festival go on sale, at 9am on Fri 22 Nov.

Arctic Monkeys have been riding high on the acclaim for latest album AM, released in September. It hasn't been all plain sailing, though – frontman Alex Turner recently contracted laryngitis and had to cancel shows at Birmingham's LG Arena and Glasgow's Hydro (the rescheduled gigs take place tonight and tomorrow respectively).

Geoff Ellis, T's Festival Director, said: 'We’re thrilled to announce Arctic Monkeys as our first headliners for T in the Park 2014. After this year’s fantastic 20th year celebrations, we asked our audience who they’d like to see at next year’s festival and Arctic Monkeys came top of the poll, so we’re really pleased to be able to confirm them for T in the Park. When they take to the stage in Glasgow this week they’ll prove exactly why they’re one of the greatest live acts around, and I’m sure we can look forward to another phenomenal set at T in the Park. We have many more fantastic acts in store which we’ll announce next year, and can’t wait to see you all again in July.'

Subscribers to T in the Park's 'T Lady' email updates can purchase tickets immediately – you can sign up at the T in the Park website. Non-subscribers can click the Tickets link below from 9am on Fri 22 Nov.

Arctic Monkeys - Why'd You Only Call Me When You're High? (Acoustic)

T in the Park

From relatively humble beginnings, T in the Park has become the acknowledged behemoth of the Scottish festival scene and one of the UK's largest events. In 2015 the festival moved from its longstanding Balado location to the new grounds of Strathallan Castle in Perthshire. Bands appearing in 2016 include The Stone…

Arctic Monkeys

The stomping Sheffield tykes have graduated from songs about chip shops and taxi ranks, but the ferocious singalong favourites of old should also make an appearance.

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