Edinburgh's Hogmanay unveils 'Scot:lands' New Year's Day events programme

Edinburgh's Hogmanay unveils 'Scot:lands' New Year's Day events programme

Lau / Photo: David Tiernan

FOUND, Lau, Smallpetitklein and Cora Bissett among the artists involved in the New Year's Day events

The Edinburgh's Hogmanay programme was officially launched today, with details of all the festive happenings in the days leading up to the bells and beyond into 2014. As ever, the organisers have provided a great cultural programme as a reward for those who are able to haul themselves out of bed on New Year's Day; in 2014, it goes under the title Scot:Lands.

A mystery tour through Edinburgh’s Old Town, Scot:Lands consists of nine ‘worlds’, each curated by some of Scotland’s most exciting artists and musicians. Among the highlights is Wander:Land, a dance through adaptations of Tolstoy and Emerson from Dundee company Smallpetitklein, with live musical accompaniment composed by Philip Glass and Charles-Marie Widor. At Shadow:Land, lost souls and party people from Cora Bissett’s award-winning multidisciplinary show Whatever Gets You Through the Night continue the revels from the night before, while Lobster:Land is curated by Street Party performer Kenny Anderson (King Creosote) and Fence Collective. New: Found:Land is curated by BAFTA winning art collective FOUND, with RM Hubbert and Edinburgh-based singer-songwriter Emily Scott joining FOUNDers Kev Sim and Ziggy Campbell on 'a performance which treats sound and silence as equals'.

All events are free and will take place in nine different venues, with wide-ranging collaborations from The Ceilidh Place, the Pathead Music Collective, Lau and Shetland Arts, amongst others. Collect your Scot:Lands map from the National Museum of Scotland on Wed 1 Jan 2014 to join in.

Edinburgh's Hogmanay

New Year is such a big deal in Scotland we even have our own name for it: that’s Hogmanay, for anyone not familiar with the local parlance. For proof of just how sacred a ritual sending off the old and welcoming in the new is here, look no further than Edinburgh’s Hogmanay, which from ad hoc roots a couple of decades…

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