Andrew Garfield wants gay Spider-Man

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Andrew Garfield

Andrew Garfield as Spider-Man

Andrew Garfield would love it if his 'Amazing Spider-Man 2' alter-ego, Peter Parker, was gay and would love his on-screen love interest Mary Jane Watson to be a man.

Andrew Garfield wants his 'Amazing Spider-Man 2' alter-ego to be gay.

The 29-year-old actor - who is dating co-star Emma Stone, who plays Gwen Stacy in the film - would prefer it if Spider-Man/Peter Parker was into men rather than women and even suggested to producer Matt Tolmach that his on-screen love interest Mary Jane Watson could be a guy.

He told Entertainment Weekly: "I was kind of joking, but kind of not joking about MJ. And I was like, 'What if MJ is a dude?' Why can't we discover that Peter is exploring his sexuality?

"It's hardly even groundbreaking! ... So why can't he be gay? Why can't he be into boys?"

Andrew has even placed 'The Wire' actor Michael B. Jordan at the top of his list of possible candidates to play MJ.

He added: "I've been obsessed with Michael B. Jordan since The Wire. He's so charismatic and talented. It'd be even better - we'd have interracial bisexuality!"

Andrew's comments come after Shailene Woodley filmed scenes as MJ for the forthcoming film but she has now been completely cut from the movie.

Speaking about her role being axed recently, she said: "Of course I'm bummed. But I am a firm believer in everything happening for a specific reason.

"Based on the proposed plot, I completely understand the need for holding off on introducing [Mary Jane] until the next film."

The Amazing Spider-Man 2

  • 4 stars
  • 2014
  • US
  • 142 min
  • 12A
  • Directed by: Marc Webb
  • Cast: Andrew Garfield, Emma Stone, Jamie Foxx, Dane DeHaan
  • UK release: 16 April 2014

Peter Parker (Garfield) goes up against new supervillains Electro (Foxx) and Harry Osborn (DeHaan). Garfield and Stone have enormous chemistry, Foxx and DeHaan bring complexity and pathos, and the rebooted franchise continues to capture the original character's wise-cracking energy in a way that the Raimi trilogy didn't.

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