Alastair Frazer, curator of Holography Unit, discusses his working practises

The artist is a fan of Claes Oldenburg, Robert Wyatt and French sculptor ACM

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Alastair Frazer

Caroline Palmer's Sakti Cluster

What was the first exhibition you went to see?
Claes Oldenburg’s An Anthology at Hayward Gallery. Now I think of it, there’s something about those early soft sculptures that is still near the heart of things for me.

What kind of music do you listen to while you’re working?
For company any Robert Wyatt. For escape something transportatively sonic, dark, and probably German.To counter blood sugar low adolescent spasmodic stuff still works.

What are the best things about opening nights?
Evening air.

Do you read reviews of your work?
Why not? Though nothing’s as fierce as the heat from your own peer group.

Which living artist should be better known than they currently are?
ACM. I would like to know more about him. All I can say is he’s a French artist in his 60s making absurdly detailed, almost Mayan, cathedral sculptures from tiny painted pieces of analogue circuitry and electronics. The task of restoring one of his works recently gave me some insight into his vision.

What has been your career highlight to date?
Developing the artist-run space The Woodmill in London, collaboration in constantly changing and unknown quantities. We’ve just moved into our second space – an old GP surgery.

What is your favourite work of art?
Always the one taking me closest to the brink. At the moment the Holograms I’ve gathered together for the the retrospective of the Royal College of Art Holography Unit of the 1980s/90s. Scarce, confounding, sublime, each one an iris.

What advice would you give to your younger self?
I don’t suppose he would listen. Stubborn blighter I’m told …

Alastair Frazer is curator of Holography Unit, Glue Factory, Glasgow, until Sat 6 Oct.

Holography Unit

Works produced at the world's first fine art holography department (at London's Royal College of Art) from its inception in 1985 to 1994 – a fascinating look back at what the future looked like in the past.

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