How seven key figures in Scottish culture have fared over 25 years

25 years of The List

comments

Didn’t they do well?

Scotland has more than its fair share of talent, finds Kirstin Innes, as she chronicles the highs and lows of some of our finest exports over 25 years

Peter Capaldi

1986
Although our local hero was riding high after, er, Local Hero (1983), he’s still getting bit parts, like this year in Rab C Nesbitt. (DOWN)

1988
Mixed year. Appears in Stephen Frears’ utterly brilliant Dangerous Liaisons and Ken Russell’s utterly abysmal Lair of the White Worm. (MIDDLING)

1995
Wins BAFTA and the Oscar for Best Short Film, directing the equally lanky Richard E Grant in Franz Kafka’s It’s a Wonderful Life. (UP)

1996
Virtually haunting our screens as ghostly biker hunk Uncle Rory in the excellent adaptation of The Crow Road and Angel Islington in the almost-as-good Neverwhere. (UP)

1997
Paying the bills with a cameo in Bean. All time career low, not just for Capaldi, but in the history of careers. (DOWN)

2005
After years in the wilderness (bit-parts in My Family and Foyle’s War?), wins sheer gift of a role: Malcolm Tucker in The Thick of It. (UP)

2009
Tucker goes to the big screen with In The Loop; Capaldi shows versatility/brings us all to tears as a repressed civil servant in Torchwood. (UP)

2010
After being nominated twice before, finally picks up the BAFTA for Best Male Performance as (who else) Malcolm Tucker in The Thick of It. (UP)

Carol Ann Duffy

1985
Standing Female Nude, her first solo collection of poetry, is published, announcing the arrival of a loud, proud feminist voice. Hurrah! (UP)

1986
And the Scottish Arts Council Book of the Year Award goes to … Carol Ann Duffy, for Standing Female Nude. (UP)

1993
Having spent the late 80s hoovering up the Dylan Thomas, Somerset Maugham and Cholmondeley Awards, wins a Whitbread for Mean Time. (UP)

1999
Publishes arguably her best-known collection, the bawdy and excellent The World’s Wife. Poet Laureate Ted Hughes dies, and CAD is one of the favourites to take his job, but it goes to Andrew Motion. (MIDDLING)

2002
The Queen proves herself a Duffy fan; upgrading her 1995 OBE to Commander of the Order of the British Empire. (UP)

2005
Rapture, an achingly lovely collection of love poems rumoured to be about her recent split from fellow writer, Jackie Kay, wins the TS Eliot prize, UK poetry’s top award. (UP)

2008
Her poem ‘Education For Leisure’ is removed from GSCE syllabus due to moral outrage. Duffy claims it’s anti-violence and writes satirical poem ‘Mrs Schofield’s GSCE’ as revenge. (DOWN)

2009
Finally, finally named first-ever female Poet Laureate, to almost universal acclaim. Her first public act? A sonnet on the MPs’ expenses scandal. (UP)

Ian Rankin

1986
Polygon publish a very limited run of his first novel, coming-of-age yarn The Flood, now a collectors’ item. (MIDDLING)

1987
With Knots & Crosses, Rankin gives what must have been a rather boozy birth, probably in the bogs at the Oxford Bar, to Inspector Rebus. (UP)

1991
After flirting with other, less thrilling heroes, returns to the winning formula, publishing Rebus books two and three, Hide & Seek and Tooth & Nail (UP)

1997
Cocks a snook at never-found Scots serial killer Bible John with the classic Black and Blue and wins CWA’s Gold Dagger (top award) for his pains. (UP)

2000
Rebus moves to telly, but John Hannah looks weirdly skinny in the crumpled raincoat (will be recast with a far more suitable Ken Stott in 2005). (DOWN)

2005
Nabs himself a Cartier Diamond Dagger Award, the Crime Writers’ Association’s version of a lifetime achievement gong. Probably doubles up as handy murder weapon. (UP)

2007
Guest-edits The List, obviously an all-time career high. Oh, and Rebus retires, in 17th novel Exit Music. (UP)

2010
Turns 50 and celebrates by releasing an iPhone app Guide To Edinburgh. Resemblance to Paul Weller increasing by day. (UP)

Douglas Gordon

1986
Despite still being a student, and only 20, proves disgustingly precocious with four international solo shows. (UP)

1990
Begins the ongoing, lifelong work ‘List of Names’, a list of everyone he’s ever met in his life, one version of which is hanging in Edinburgh’s Gallery of Modern Art. (UP)

1993
‘24 Hour Psycho’ is devised for Tramway in Glasgow first of all and brings Gordon widespread recognition: a huge screen on which the Hitchcock classic is slowed down to 24 hours-long. (UP)

1996
Wins the Turner Prize, for Confessions of a Justified Sinner – the first video artist ever to do so. Opens floodgates for Scottish, specifically Glasgow-based artists. Celebrates with Self Portrait as Kurt Cobain, as Andy Warhol, as Myra Hindley, as Marilyn Monroe. (UP)

1999
Through A Looking Glass makes DeNiro fire that famous ‘You talkin’ to me’ back and forth at himself, a continuation of Gordon’s fascination with duality, if a bit samey. (MIDDLING)

2001
Aged only 34, gets a retrospective of his works at Geffen Contemporary in Los Angeles. Fills it full of pop culture references, obviously. (UP)

2006
The utterly amazing film Zidane: A 21st Century Portrait is a logical conclusion of Gordon’s works with time, following Zinedine Zidane through the course of one football game. Top’s The List’s Hot 100 poll. (UP)

2006—2007
First show on home soil since 1993, Douglas Gordon: Superhumannatural takes over several of Edinburgh’s major galleries, and engages again with dualism and the Caledonian Antisyzygy. We knew he hadn’t forgotten us! (UP)

2010
Back to Glasgow to re-show 24 Hour Psycho, Back and Forth, To and Fro at Tramway for Glasgow International. Also, randomly, does tour visuals for Rufus Wainwright. (UP)

Tilda Swinton

1986
First collaboration of many with director Derek Jarman in Caravaggio. And, er, The List misspells her name as ‘Tilda Swanton’ in issue 12. Sorry, Tild. (MIDDLING)

1992
Makes her name, firmly and internationally, with the eponymous role in Sally Potter’s fantastic version of Virginia Woolf’s Orlando. (UP)

1995
Sleeps for a week in a glass case in the Serpentine Gallery, described as ‘her greatest ever performance’ and establishing her as a woman who breathes art. (UP)

1996
Dons a blue swimming cap and creeps about London hunting golf balls like a beautiful alien lizard in Orbital’s seminal video for The Box. (UP)

2001
Goes a bit mainstream with a role in Vanilla Sky. Tilda Swinton and Tom Cruise? Never thought we’d say that. Ew. (DOWN)

2005
After the dark, lovely Young Adam (2004), she manages to be the only interesting thing about Disney’s Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe, and had us rooting for the White Witch. (UP)

2007
Her Best Supporting Actress Oscar for Michael Clayton is overshadowed by tabloid gossip as she turns up with lover Sandro Kopp, not long-term partner John Byrne. (MIDDLING)

2008
Founds the deliberately grungy Nairn film festival Ballerina Ballroom Cinema of Dreams with Mark Cousins (yay!), but is in rubbish Coen Brothers film Burn After Reading. (MIDDLING)

2010
Lynne Ramsey casts her as the lead in her adaptation of Lionel Shriver’s We Need to Talk About Kevin. We are excited about this. (UP)

Edwyn Collins

1985
Orange Juice, already reduced to a duo following ‘musical differences’ release final album, the critically ‘meh’-d The Orange Juice and split. (DOWN)

1989
His first solo album, Hope and Despair, is great but kinda pessimistic. Taking the split hard, fella? (MIDDLING)

1994
Out of nowhere, Collins releases bubbly joy ‘A Girl Like You’, officially The Catchiest Song of the 1990s. Never has to work again. Probably. (UP)

1999
Channel 4 pick up his sitcom, the quietly under-rated West Heath Yard. Collins himself stars, with guests including Natalie Imbruglia and Bernard Butler. (UP)

2002
Puts out two albums (OK, one of them is a best-of but the other, Dr Syntax, is still pretty great). Also making waves as a record producer. (UP)

2005
Suffers a sudden, shocking double brain haemorrhage, from which he makes a slow, against-all-odds recovery. (DOWN)

2009
Following a gradual recuperation, plays T in the Park, receives an Ivor Novello Inspiration Award and publishes a book of illustrations. No, there is no end to his talent. No, you are not worthy. (UP)

2010
Ascends to National Treasure status and his new album Losing Sleep, with contributions from Franz Ferdinand, Johnny Marr and The Cribs, is a corker! (UP)

JK Rowling

1990
Harry Potter springs, fully-formed, into her head one day on a train journey. Rowling’s mother dies later that year, an event which she says changed her world and Harry’s forever. (MIDDLING)

1993
Arrives in Edinburgh with baby daughter Jessica, and begins desperately writing in cafes — most notably Nicholson’s, now Spoon, on Nicholson Street. We salute your taste in eateries, JK. (UP)

1996
After being turned down by various publishers and agents who have since hurt themselves, Rowling and Potter sign to Bloomsbury in the UK and Scholastic in the US. (UP)

1997
Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone becomes a children’s publishing sensation, and wins the Smarties Book Prize. (UP)

2000
Everyone’s favourite Potter, The Prisoner of Azakaban, wins Whitbread Children’s Book of the Year, while the just-released Goblet of Fire breaks sales records. (UP)

2001
The first Potter film is released to huge worldwide grosses, making stars of little Daniel Radcliffe and Emma Watson’s maddening diction. (MIDDLING)

2003
Makes mothers miserable by killing off the only fanciable grown-up Sirius Black, in the long-awaited Order of the Phoenix. (DOWN)

2007
The final instalment, The Deathly Hallows, is completed in room 652 of the Balmoral Hotel, and released six months later (without much editing). (MIDDLING)

2010-2011
The final film in the series is split into two parts, set to gross eight squillion pounds at box office. Yes, that’s an official figure. (UP)

Comments

Post a comment