Klaxons 'not a band' on debut

Klaxons claim they ''weren't a band'' when they recorded their first album, but a ''collection of ideas by three people'' worked into a record by a producer

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Klaxons

Klaxons

Klaxons claim they "weren't a band" when they recorded their first album.

The UK dance-pop group released their second album 'Surfing The Void' yesterday (23.08.10), and bassist Jamie Reynolds says it is a much more complete body of work than the band's first effort, 2007s 'Myths Of The Near Future'.

He told Spinnermusic.co.uk: "We fundamentally weren't a band on our first record

"We were very much a collection of ideas by three people that reached out and worked with a producer. That then allowed us to make these ideas into the realities of being songs and us a band."

"We wished our success into existence and we naively carried that with us. And the spirit carried us to the point that everything worked."

'Myths Of The Near Future' went on to become one of the moist critically acclaimed albums of 2007 and landed the band - completed by James Righton, Simon Taylor-Davis and Steffan Halperin - the prestigious Mercury Music award.

Following up the album wasn't easy for the band, however, and their initial efforts in 2008 were rejected by their record label. Trouble finding the right producer for the group's sound also lead to long delays before they finally settled on Ross Robinson, who is best known for working with Heavy metals groups including Slipknot and Korn.

Jamie said Ross pushed drummer Steffan the hardest, telling website Drowned In Sound: "It's noticeable how much bigger everything sounds now. Stefan is like a different man thanks to Ross."

He added that Ross immediately clicked with the band and that: "He just came along and everything started working."

Klaxons

Mercury Prize-winners with a blaring ravey indie sound.

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