Torsten Lauschmann: The Darker Ages (4 stars)

comments
Torsten Lauschmann: The Darker Ages

The art of technology

Torsten Lauschmann is an artist’s artist: highly regarded by his Glasgow-based peers, he never fails to impress. This show featuring a new body of work conjures up a cinematic experience as you enter a darkened room and find yourself somewhere between the thin veneer of reality and a filmic verisimilitude.

The space is filled with projected images and the various pieces of equipment become integral to the works as projectors cast their own light shadows, asserting themselves as intriguing objects. In ‘House of the rising sun’, the image of a solitary house is projected on top of a wall painted landscape and filled with luminescence that filters through the windows to cast long shards of light onto the dark planet. Watch carefully and you’ll see a figure move through the interior.

In a mesmerising video projection, the mechanics of the Victorian optical toy the thaumatrope – a precursor of animation and cinematography – have been employed to create a double-sided disk. An image of a young girl on the one side and an older woman photographed with a group of children on the other, spin like a wheel of time, accelerating closer and closer to infinity. Like a memory coming to life, vivid, yet wonderfully magical, it provokes that enrapturing child-like feeling that we don’t often disclose to others.

Lauschmann’s works are fabricated in order to offer the viewer an engaging process of decoding. Here he manipulates cinematic technology to tell stories of its history while building new narratives through seductive imagery, creating an allure that exists on the edges of different worlds and unsettles as much as it enchants.

‘He’s got the whole world in his hand’ is a Mac laptop pierced with a biro pen, the screen splintered into small sections, some blacked out and others remaining backlit. It functions both as dead wood and technology, and a tool to project a soundtrack of Tuvan throat singing – the motif of duality continued in the style of overtone chanting.

Spot on. This exhibition is a remedy inspired by a darker aged recipe only a white witch could have whispered in Lauschmann’s ear.

Mary Mary, Glasgow, until Sat 21 Nov

Torsten Lauschmann: The Darker Ages

  • 4 stars

Featuring mesmerising video projections, Lauschmann's new body of work conjures up a cinematic experience as you enter a darkened room and find yourself somewhere between the thin veneer of reality and a filmic verisimillitude. Here he manipulates cinematic technology to tell stories of its history while building new…

Comments

Post a comment