Various - Glasgow School Of Art Goes Pop (4 stars)

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Glasgow School Of Art Goes Pop

(Art Goes Pop)

INDIE

With such recent exports as The Pigeon Detectives and Kaiser Chiefs, it’s no wonder the smart new music-lovers of Leeds are looking elsewhere for the really interesting stuff. In celebration of some of Glasgow’s finest young noiseniks, widely respected label Art Goes Pop have tenderly pieced together this magnificent collection; and from post rock attacks to garagey psych pop, infectious tweecore, electro punk, eccentric electronica and ramshackle folk, every possible taste is catered for. Of course, probably not all of it will be to your liking, but it’s clear from the thrilling selection on display that Scotland’s West Coast scene has never sounded more innovative.

Kicking off with the gritty, skew-whiff riffs and clever lyrics of ‘I.S.O.S.C.E.L.E.S’ by – you guessed it – Isosceles, the opening track provides one of the record’s first real treats, with other highlights coming thick and fast in the form of Punch & the Apostles’ compelling dark waltz ‘Neuf Janvier’, the glorious ‘Cressida’ by C86-lovers The Low Miffs and a nihilistic scuzz-fest ‘Five For You’ by Clean George.

And the second half is just as good. It all gets wildly surreal with Yoko, Oh No! and Bruce McClure’s ‘Crystal Crocodile’ – a rather delicious blip bleep pop offering which features some incredibly strange ramblings about granny undergarments and French fancies (but not together), followed by another smattering of standout efforts including Zoey Van Goey’s sublime ‘Two White Ghosts’, ‘Lucas’ by spiky art punk bunch Nacional, Orphans’ frantic racket ‘Learned Orifice’ and the chiming indie of Jack Butler’s ‘Surgery 1984’.

Of course there are notable omissions; there’s no Sexy Kids, Dananananaykroyd, Findo Gask, Frightened Rabbit or Dolby Anol for starters, but Glasgow School Of Art Goes Pop proves there’s so much more to the city than your average pub rock stompalong, fey corduroy-wearers or arch pop-fops. That’s right Franz, Fratellis and Glasvegas – watch your backs.

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