The Orielles: 'We make it a fun experience for us as both musicians and listeners'

The Orielles: 'We make it a fun experience for us as both musicians and listeners'

credit: Hollie Fernando

Guitarist Henry Carlyle Wade tells us about the band's latest release and its cosmic overtones

In 2018, Halifax four-piece the Orielles officially arrived with their debut album Silver Dollar Moment, an effortlessly hooky guitar album that mixed post-punk, funk, garage-rock and dance across its twelve tracks. At the end of February, the band return with their sophomore album Disco Volador which, preceded by singles 'Come Down on Jupiter' and 'Space Samba', pushes the group's sound further into the cosmos.

Unlike many emerging guitar bands, the Orielles do not go for anthemic choruses or bloated riffs in their music, instead focusing on evoking a pleasurable, rhythmic and physical experience for their audience.

'The songs always start as instrumentals, and we play them as a band,' says guitarist Henry Carlyle Wade about the group's approach to songwriting. 'And that is where we structure it and write all the parts. So, if a song is not enjoyable for us to play, then we drop it. We make it a fun experience for us as both musicians and listeners, which we then hope gets paid over to the audience'.

Between Silver Dollar Moment and the new album, the group released the one-off single 'Bobbi's Second World'. It was originally written amongst the newer tracks but finished early and released into the world. This song, alongside a cover of Peggy Gou's hit 'It Makes You Forget (Itgehane)', showcased the group's rapid maturation and fearlessness, playing with rhythm and borrowing techniques from music not usually played by young guitar bands.

Wade tells us that the band conceptualised the album with the working title 'Boogie to Space, Space to Boogie'. Although that title was eventually ditched in favour of the snappier Disco Volador, the ideas behind the original title became more of a motif. 'Boogie to Space' refers to the cosmic aspects of the album, reflecting the funk/disco music that the group have increasingly been listening to and will 'definitely allow people to get down', whilst 'Space to Boogie' is about giving room to breathe, and space to build up tension and release, which the group recognise as an essential component of catchy music.

Wade is confident about their live show, and excited for the audiences to hear the new tracks. Soon the band will embark on a string of live dates around the release of the new album, before venturing over to USA for South By South West. Beyond that, the band will be at festivals all over the summer, offering audiences the space to boogie with them, as they boogie to space.

Disco Volador is out Fri 28 Feb on Heavenly. The Orielles are on tour in the UK until Fri 6 Mar.

The Orielles

The indie trio plays pop with lilting harmonies, jangling guitars and pounding wave-like bass sounds.

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