Five shows getting a deserved repeat appearance in Edinburgh and Glasgow in 2020

Five shows getting a deserved repeat appearance in Edinburgh and Glasgow in 2020

Pride and Prejudice (Sort Of)

Including an adaptation of Pride and Prejudice, a documentary play and a spectacular piece of gig theatre

Although it is often the larger commercial companies that can tour a production – leading to a stream of familiar scripts revisiting Scotland and presenting a broadly conservative repertoire that majors on Shakespeare, celebrity vehicles and murder mysteries –, the revivals and returns of smaller scale productions, including Edinburgh Fringe successes, reflect a range of themes and issues that are perhaps closer to contemporary concerns. Across the next few months, certain shows reveal that theatre and performance are still examining the state of the national consciousness.

Pride and Prejudice (Sort Of)
A welcome return for Isobel McArthur's adaptation of Jane Austen's classic. With its feminist perspective, and Paul Brotherston's vivacious direction, Pride and Prejudice (Sort Of) manages to comment on the novel's popular cultural status, race through a romance with a unique yet respectful take on Mr Darcy, poke at the hidden assumptions of the era and combine intelligence and wit.
Lyceum, Edinburgh, Thu 23 Jan–Sat 15 Feb.

Trojan Horse
This documentary play had a degree of controversy and a greater degree of success at the 2018 Edinburgh Fringe, telling the stories of Muslim teachers and governors who were accused of promoting extremism through a Birmingham school. With the UK still struggling to combat Islamophobia, or respond consistently to multiculturalism, Trojan Horse remains, sadly, immediate and provocative.
Traverse, Edinburgh, Tue 11 & Wed 12 Feb; Tron, Glasgow, Thu 13–Sat 15 Feb.

Mouthpiece
Kieran Hurley looks at class consciousness and Edinburgh's creative scene through the relationship between an older writer and a young man who struggles with a difficult home life. Questioning the right of the arts to tell the stories of the exploited, and depicting two versions of Edinburgh, Hurley's distinctive political voice challenges the easy answers.
Traverse, Edinburgh, Thu 6–Sat 15 Feb; Tron, Glasgow, Thu 27–Sat 29 Feb.

Daddy Drag
Leyla Josephine mashes up drag and spoken word to consider the father. Humorous yet intelligent, it landed the artist a place in 2019's Hot 100 and demonstrates how experimental and queer performance can engage with familiar topics and offer an original perspective.
Tron, Glasgow, Wed 26–Sat 29 Feb.

Wind Resistance
Having become something of an icon for successful gig theatre, Karine Polwart comes back to the venue that co-created this magical and music reflection on the migration patterns of geese, which ranges across matters of ecology, nostalgia, maternity and memoir, to demonstrate the power of fusing theatrical dramaturgy and contemporary folk song.
Lyceum, Edinburgh, Wed 25–Sat 28 Mar.

Wind Resistance

  • 5 stars

Every autumn, two and a half thousand pink-footed geese fly from Greenland to winter at Fala Flow, a peat-bog south-east of Edinburgh. Musician Karine Polwart captures the surrounding landscape through story and song, taking in history, bird lore and personal memoir.

Pride and Prejudice (Sort Of)

An irreverent all-female adaptation of Jane Austen's classic love story, with all the ruthless matchmaking we've come to expect, with the addition of some new characters from below-stairs.

Leyla Josephine: Daddy Drag

Leyla attempts to understand what it means to be a father through her witty performance style, drag costumes and complex but unconditional love for her dad.

Trojan Horse

Amnesty International Freedom of Expression & Fringe First awards winner theatre play.

Mouthpiece

  • 4 stars

Kieran Hurley looks at class consciousness and Edinburgh's creative scene through the relationship between an older writer and a young man who struggles with a difficult home life.

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